When is it OK to Text and Drive? At the Driving Simulator Event June 10

GW Science and Tech Campus to Host Distracted Driver Simulation Demonstration
June 09, 2010

 

 

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

GW SCIENCE AND TECH CAMPUS TO HOST
DISTRACTED DRIVER SIMULATION DEMONSTRATION

MEDIA CONTACTS:
Corporate and Community Relations, 703-726-3650;
gwvirginia@va.gwu.edu

Courtney Bowe
(202) 994-5631; cmbowe@gwu.edu

***MEDIA ADVISORY***


Media Will Have the Opportunity to Take the Wheel and Experience Simulators

EVENT: The George Washington University's Science and Technology Campus Center for Intelligent Systems Research (CISR) located in Ashburn, Va. will host the Society of Automotive Engineers' (SAE) monthly meeting titled, "When is it Okay to Text and Drive?" Dr. Azim Eskandarian, director, GW CISR and GW Transportation Safety and Security Program, as well as Konstantin Sizov of Drive Square Inc. will present the latest vehicle simulation technologies. Attendees will learn about the two driving simulators housed at the CISR, and also about the portable simulator system by Drive Square, Inc. to understand what happens to drivers when they are distracted. Media will have the opportunity to participate and experience the simulators.

WHEN: Thursday, June 10, 2010 Noon - 2:00 p.m. Event is open to media once research presentations and demonstrations begin.

WHERE: The George Washington University Virginia Science and Technology Campus Exploration Hall - 20101 Academic Way, Ashburn, VA 20147

RSVP: Media interested in attending the event or speaking with Dr. Azim Eskandarian or Konstantin Sizov of Drive Square should contact Corporate and Community Relations, 703-726-3650 or gwvirginia@va.gwu.edu, or Courtney Bowe at 202-994-5631 or cmbowe@gwu.edu.

BACKGROUND: As Secretary of Transportation Ray LaHood urges the nation to stop texting while driving, join the Washington DC Society of Automotive Engineers (SAE) section for an introduction to driving simulator technologies at the George Washington University Center for Intelligent Systems Research (CISR). Attendees will learn about the two driving simulators housed at the CISR, and also about the portable simulator system by Drive Square, Inc. to understand what happens to drivers when they are distracted. After a short presentation on the simulators, attendees will be given the opportunity to take the wheel and experience the simulators for themselves.

The GW CISR driving simulator laboratory can be used to study the effects of a wide range of factors, including drowsiness and distractions. The simulator provides a realistic driving experience with a visual display featuring a 135 degree wide-angle field of view, auditory feedback, authentic steering feel, and validated vehicle dynamics simulation. The Drive Square Simulation System is a portable system that can be used in virtually any vehicle. The vehicle's front wheels are placed on turntables and the driver wears a set of virtual reality glasses while simulator sensors are non-invasively mounted to vehicle controls. This system allows fast set up and can be customized to many different vehicle configurations and driving scenarios. Drive Square, Inc., located in Alexandria, Va. is a leader in providing portable in-the-actual-vehicle simulation solutions for driver training and testing. The technology allows driving an actual vehicle in a virtual world. For additional information, visit www.drivesquare.com.

The GW Virginia Science and Technology Campus, established in Loudoun County in 1991, is a robust center for innovative research, graduate education and regional corporate partnerships. As a University' science and technology campus, it hosts a dozen centers of excellence in critical areas such as energy science and technology, transportation safety, and high performance computing. The GW Virginia Campus also combines its research excellence with more than 20 exceptional graduate degree and certificate programs in business, education, and engineering, and unique undergraduate programs in the health sciences. GW has been serving Virginians for more than 50 years, beginning in Hampton Roads in 1958 and expanding its service across the Commonwealth, notably in Arlington, Alexandria and Ashburn.